get down, get funky

My smile will never be the same again.

I was looking for a dental clinic that will fix my teeth. So I browsed the internet and search for a dentist near my location which is in Evanston. While browsing, I always see this dental clinic’s name always appear on the first page. I was curious about the dental clinic so, I decided to take a look at their website and as what I’ve read they have a really nice feedbacks. I sent an inquiry regarding braces and they explained the details about the said procedure that I want and need to know. I went to the said clinic thinking that it might be another dental disaster but I was wrong. I am so happy about their work and professionalism. The dentist was very patient with me, it’s because I have really low tolerance for pain. He is concern about my thoughts and he always made me feel comfortable. after 3 months of having my braces on, I can see that there is really a big improvement and I know that my smile will never be the same again.

— 10 months ago
Pictures of women on subways continue to fascinate and piss me off. They give me a simultaneous pang of seething hatred of being the girl being stared at on the subway and an overwhelming sense of what can only be described as mortality - knowledge my time as the girl on the subway being stared at is fleeting. Fear I’m not maximizing it. As though it is something that can be owned or controlled. As though it is something I want. It is something I simultaneously desperately want and categorically reject. How is it that something that I know to be extremely unpleasant can remain so fetishized to me? What is that Mulvey quote? Something about the experience of being a woman is like constantly watching yourself be watched?

Pictures of women on subways continue to fascinate and piss me off. They give me a simultaneous pang of seething hatred of being the girl being stared at on the subway and an overwhelming sense of what can only be described as mortality - knowledge my time as the girl on the subway being stared at is fleeting. Fear I’m not maximizing it. As though it is something that can be owned or controlled. As though it is something I want. It is something I simultaneously desperately want and categorically reject. How is it that something that I know to be extremely unpleasant can remain so fetishized to me? What is that Mulvey quote? Something about the experience of being a woman is like constantly watching yourself be watched?

— 10 months ago
When I was very little I saw an episode of Boy Meets World where Topanga advocated that in her ideal world men would be kept underground, used only for manual labor and breeding purposes.

It sounded like a great idea at the time and I’m not sure anything I’ve observed or experienced since then has really refuted it.

— 10 months ago
The Guardian: Any advice for a 21-year-old who hates their job and has the possibility of traveling the world? And has a boyfriend that they like. (This is for a friend.)
Rob Delaney: Go do it. Fuck him. Is he a guy in his 20s? Then he’s the least significant type of person on the planet. A male in their 20s? Run in the opposite direction. Nothing he says matters; his fears, his hopes his dreams are garbage. Men in their 20s are the worst thing happening on our planet. Go, go to Uzbekistan, go to South Korea, just go anywhere he isn’t because men in their 20s are bad for young women.
The Guardian: So what do women in their 20s do?
Rob Delaney: Masturbate. Date other women for a while. Use men sexually for a while but don’t ever invite their opinion or be bound to them in any way.
— 10 months ago
Ugh on “waxing for 15 year old girls

We all agree that beauty standards are terrible etc etc. I am not going to dispute that. However, this post at Sociological Images doesn’t sit well with me. Sure we agree that no girl should be pressured to wax or remove any body hair ever. No woman should be pressured either, for that matter. However, I was first called ”Lobizon” (a werewolf like creature from South American legends) when I was 12. The angst I had over a layer of thick, dark hair over my upper lip and freaking sideburns! (I was, like many other teens, a hormonal mess).  I didn’t want to wear skirts not even in super hot summers because I was mortified by the same dark and thick hair on my legs (which were regularly referred to as “cepillos” -a brush of the same kind one would use to brush hair). 

Sure, the ad is illustrated with a normative photo of a white girl with blond hair but let’s not pretend that beauty standards or even needs* are the same across all ethnicities and cultures.

*I would contend that addressing a girl’s angst over her body and the associated bullying over hair is a need. And while we debate the cruelty of beauty standards which might take generations to fix, we could perhaps address the here and now of many girls, of which I was one, who would prefer waxing rather than ” rhetoric empowerment”.

I have no issue with 15 year olds waxing in general. Even kids as young as 9-12 when it comes to arms, legs, unibrows, (depending on how hairy they are), as long as it’s done because s/he wants to and is coupled with a legit strong “You are beautiful/Everyone Is A Mess” message. Personally, I only shave my armpits to this day because it’s genuinely more physically comfortable for me. I hate conforming to social pressure, but sometimes a little reasonable hair removal is really the easiest way to make yourself more comfortable physically/mentally.

The issue that I had with the ad featured in sociological images was that it implied to me that it was referring to bikini/vulva waxing. Let them grapple with legs and armpits before they start having to figure out their stance on that.

— 10 months ago
Fucking evil companies

Okay, this is the third thing like this I’ve received in a month. This is officially a thing.

Companies are sponsoring “workshops” for student and recent graduate digital artists and graphic designers. In these workshops, they create ad campaigns for the companies. The companies then keep the work and are allowed to use it however they want. They give out nominal prizes at the end, which technically makes this a “competition” and puts it in a legal grey area.

Students are told they “might get a job.” They are not told the workshops are hosted by consultants and unemployed graphic designers hired for the day that have no ability to provide them with said job or any future work.

— 11 months ago